1977

The LGBTQ Center of Long Beach is founded and quickly gains prominence. Five years later they host the first Long Beach Lesbian & Gay Pride Festival & Parade at a time when the community was criminalized and suffering from the AIDS epidemic. The pride parade is still held annually in June, and today it is the third largest in the nation.

 
 
 

The 1970s were a period of reflection on human behavior and presented a dramatic shift in the ways people connected with each other and expressed themselves.

In this year, the LGBTQ Center of Long Beach is founded and quickly gains prominence as an institution advocating for the rights and health of the LGBTQ community. Shortly after their founding, they organize the first Long Beach Lesbian & Gay Pride Festival & Parade, which was significant due to the fact that LGBTQ individuals were still classified as ‘mentally ill’ by the medical profession and their community was suffering from the AIDS epidemic.

In 1982, James Q. Wilson, a graduate of Jordan High School, coauthored and important article on human sociology. His “Broken Windows Theory” presented the idea that the visibility of broken windows and other deteriorated buildings in a neighborhood contributed to the perception that the neighborhood was ‘not worth’ investing in, and encouraged criminal behavior in that neighborhood. His writing heavily influenced the political scene of the 1980’s, and remains a key theory among sociologists, political scientists, and even law enforcement who develop approaches to address urban crime.

 

Sources we used and further reading on this era of Long Beach:

  • Kelling, George L., and James Q. Wilson. 1982. Broken Windows: The police and neighborhood safety," The Atlantic Vol. 249(3): 29-38.